The Wonder Years

Crank It Loud presents

The Wonder Years

Tigers Jaw, Tiny Moving Parts, Worriers

Tue · May 8, 2018

6:00 pm

$22-25

This event is all ages

The Wonder Years
The Wonder Years
Philadelphian pop-punk band formed in 2005.
Tigers Jaw
Tigers Jaw
Tigers Jaw is an American rock band from Scranton, Pennsylvania, formed in 2005.

Current members :
Brianna Collins – keyboards, vocals (2006-present)
Ben Walsh – guitars, vocals (2007-present) drums (2005-2007)

Former members :
Mike May – drums (2007)
Adam McIlwee – guitars, vocals (2005-2013)
Dennis Mishko – bass (2007-2013)
Pat Brier – drums (2007-2013)
Tiny Moving Parts
Tiny Moving Parts
Bandmates call each other "family" all the time–when you're in a van or bus touring for most of the year, fostering a close relationship is an integral part of the territory. Feuds and disagreements amongst bandmates can be career-ending for even the most promising young acts, while groups that stay tight-knit can experience longevity.

When it comes to Tiny Moving Parts, a literal family band from the tiny town of Benson, MN, there's no problem operating in close quarters. Vocalist/guitarist Dylan Mattheisen and his cousins–bassist Matthew Chevalier and drummer Billy Chevalier, who are brothers–have been best friends since their childhood. As Mattheisen puts it: "We'd be hanging out every day no matter what."

Growing up in what many people would simply describe as "the middle of nowhere," Mattheisen and his bandmates didn't have the same path into punk music as most young people do. Without a structured or storied local scene, the three found music on their own terms and created a positive connection to it from the beginning.

In fact, the first thing you realize when you talk to the guys in Tiny Moving Parts is how much joy they derive from being on the road. They've used their music to visit places they never thought they'd be able to go while growing up on the sprawling farmlands of their Minnesota hometown, which houses just 3,000 residents. They've built connections with people all over the country, delivering the same positive attitude they've had toward music all their lives to people who they never thought they'd meet. And, perhaps most impressively, Mattheisen and his cousins are the type of band that appreciates even the nuances of being on the road–navigating their way into a city for the first time, sleeping on living room floors, setting up and breaking down their gear, even the long overnight drives–it's not only worth it to Tiny Moving Parts, it's a part of their essence. The permanent smiles on their faces while they're playing will make you believe that before they even finish their opening song.

The group's positive mindset and close relationship helped them "figure out their sound" over the past couple of years, as Mattheisen says. Their new album, Pleasant Living, out September 9 via Triple Crown Records, showcases a band that has moved past its growing pains and is finding its tride. From the youthful exuberance and frenetic drum work on the opening "Sundress" to the purposefully suppressed yet intense closer "Van Beers," it's apparent from first listen that Tiny Moving Parts knew exactly what they wanted to do with Pleasant Living. And with the help of producer extraordinaire J. Robbins, they were able to get right down to it in a fashion that excels their sophomore status, entering the realm of veteran pomp. Pleasant Living isn't afraid to belt you with its power, it isn't apologetic about being in your face–and neither are the lively personas behind the band.

"I think we've found a happy balance here," Mattheisen says of his band's follow-up to 2013's This Couch Is Long And Full Of Friendship (Kind Of Like Records). "It's mathy, it's complex, it's thought-out, but there's still an element of having fun sing-along songs in there. We really can't wait for people to hear the album." Lead single "Always Focused" defines the dynamic Mattheisen speaks of, with a noodly guitar riff and cries of, "I let myself down when I beat myself up." He says it's a song about worrying: "Even though I overthink everything, I wouldn't have it any other way."

Where This Couch Is Long was a story of a young person trying to discover themselves, Pleasant Living accurately reflects the group's collective unbridled enthusiasm; it's a record about finding a way to remain optimistic in life. It's honest punk rock written by three guys from the Midwest who are experiencing the world together for the first time, and it's a record that Tiny Moving Parts will take to every person who will listen.
Worriers
Worriers
Lauren Denitzio is a maven at writing pop-punk anthems. Playing music for over a decade —beginning with the New Brunswick punk band The Measure [sa]—we had yet to see what Denitzio could accomplish as a sole songwriter until recently. Worriers, the Brooklyn-based band fronted by Denitzio and joined by friends, has released the 7" "Past Lives" on No Idea Records in 2011, the 12" EP "Cruel Optimist" on Don Giovanni Records in 2013, as well as the 7" "Sinead O'Rebellion" on Yo-Yo Records in 2013. This summer, Worriers brings us their finest work to date, with Laura Jane Grace of Against Me! as producer, on their first full-length release Imaginary Life.

Being released by Don Giovanni Records, Imaginary Life is Denitzio's first time single-handedly generating an entire record's worth of material. Accompanied by Rachel Rubino (Each Other's Mothers, Troubled Sleep) and John McLean (Dead Dog, Todd Killingz) on lead guitars, Audrey Zee Whitesides (Mal Blum, Little Waist) on bass, Mike Yannich (The Ergs) on drums, and Lou Hanman (Caves) on backing vocals, Denitzio also asked Laura Jane Grace to produce the record. Working with a woman producer, and someone who came from a DIY background, was crucial to Denitzio. Grace enthusiastically agreed and brought on Marc Hudson, Against Me!'s front-of-house sound person and tour manager, to engineer the record at his studio in Fenton, MI. Grace also took Worriers on a nine-day tour with Against Me! in February to become better acquainted with their sound. In the studio, the group worked meticulously on the tracks—even creating multiple versions of certain songs using Casio beats—to give them time to develop into exactly what they were looking to create.

"I was writing songs that had to do with moments in my life that only happened very briefly, or things that could have happened had things gone a little differently, both in positive and negative ways," says Denitzio. "I don't mean regrets, but how life could be entirely different if you make a couple of different choices."

While Imaginary Life doesn't stray too far from past Worriers' releases, it resonates stronger than ever in both sound and message. It flows fittingly backwards, opening with "Jinx," a softer song that barely hits the one-minute-mark. We are presented with what seems to be a reflection of the current state of life and a fear of change, how goods things have been and wanting to hold onto that. From here, the album cracks wide open into all that ever came before. "Glutton for Distance," with it's mathy guitar leads and overflowing lyrics, depicts the desire to sustain a long-distance relationship. In "Chasing," there is a bit of a departure from what we've come to know of Worriers; it's pop beat is reminiscence of something we'd hear on the radio rather than at a punk show. It's unexpected but natural, juxtaposed to dark lyrics about giving into unrequited love and carried along by Denitzio's polished vocals. In the resolute political ballad "They / Them / Theirs" we are questioned regarding notions of the gender binary and the frustrations that come with it. "Plans" and "Most Space," two of the catchiest songs on Imaginary Life, are reminders of what tripped us up over Denitzio's songwriting in the first place—fast and infectious guitars, anthemic lyrics, and unyielding vocals that Worriers never fails to provide.
Venue Information:
Arizona Pete’s
2900 Patterson St
Greensboro, NC, 27407
http://www.arizonapetes.com/